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Mark Lewis

On Application
UK

Mark prides himself on being a problem solver who tries to use the law to achieve the desired effect. As a solicitor advocate, his tenacious and brave pursuit of the civil wrongs perpetrated by journalists at the News of the World lead to: -

  • The establishment of the Leveson Enquiry;
  • The $3 million payment to the bereaved parents of Milly Dowler.
  • The ultimate closure of the News of the World
  • And the far reaching exposure and forensic review of the relationship between the Press, Politicians and the Police.

He has been acclaimed by the world's media and has been responsible for many of the damage payments made throughout the phone hacking scandal. He has been hailed by The Wall Street Journal as The man who took on 'civil wrong' and won! 
 

Mark identified the News of the World as the source of "phone-hacking". Linking the, as then, claims of a 'rogue royal reporter' to the hundreds of stories emanating from this illegal practice. What follows was a sea change of opinion from the public and law makers alike. The ramifications continue on both sides of the Atlantic and across print media titles in the UK.

Mark has a significant Claimant practice covering individuals who are subject to press intrusion from high profile sports personalities to celebrities on the protection of their reputation. His experience extends to complex scientific libels, defending Dr Peter Wilmshurst amongst others from libel actions, to the defence of financial institutions, and football fans who blogged.

A significant part of Mark's practice relates to the protection of privacy and the impact of European Law on the domestic rights of victims of intrusion. Mark has undertaken many intellectual property cases, and advises on the protection of "image rights". Several of Mark's cases have been reported in the legal press and are used as precedents.

 

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Mark Lewis

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